• Steel red-hot for weight reduction
      The steel industry's focus to remain a top material choice has not diminished, especially with automakers and suppliers looking for ways to lightweight passenger vehicles to meet the U.S. government's 54.5-mpg fleet average requirement in 2025.
    • Global Viewpoints
      The latest strategies are investigated for vehicle development by automakers and major suppliers.
    • Sports cars embrace array of green technology
      IMSA Tudor United SportsCar Championship promotes a variety of green technologies to link racing to the road.
    • More gears, more challenges
      Many strategies, as well as key software and hardware aspects related to controllers, networks, sensors, and actuators, must be considered to keep automatic transmissions shifting smoothly as more gears are added to improve fuel economy.
    • Advancing structural composites
      Industry experts address the opportunities and challenges involved with moving toward composite-intensive vehicles, including Nissan's effort to produce a high-volume, fully recyclable composite liftgate with low metal content.
    • Systems-engineering a new 4x4 benchmark
      Chrysler Powertrain teamed with AAM to create the industry's most capable, sophisticated-and arguably most fuel-efficient-AWD/4WD driveline. Top engineers talk about their collaboration.
    • Achates aims at 2025 light-truck power
      After more than a decade of steady development, Achates Power's opposed-piston two-stroke diesel is impressing powertrain experts with its test results and pace of technical progress.
    • Lighter, stronger chassis
      Development of a new high-strength aluminum casting alloy for the production of suspension components.
    • Driving good dynamics
      How the demands of safety, light weight, ride, and handling can be brought together to create cars of character.
    • No hands, lots of brains
      A hefty amount of computing power built with new hardware and software architectures will be needed when vehicles begin taking over more of the driving tasks.
    • Aerodynamics and flow simulations come of age
      With the advent of faster computers, engineers are using CFD software as a practical tool, shaping designs early in the product development cycle. The challenges today are in how best to use it and by whom.
    • New rules shuffle the F1 deck
      New turbocharged hybrid-electric power units and revised aerodynamics may scramble the familiar order in Formula One for 2014.
    • Stars of the show floor
      The editors of Automotive Engineering annually select from among SAE World Congress exhibitors the technologies that meet their criteria for a coveted Tech Award. Judging is based on level of design and engineering innovation, uniqueness, potential for 'real world' production application, and potential benefit for industry customers and end users. Read on for articles on the five SAE 2014 Tech Award winners, followed by briefs on additional show-floor highlights that we call 'What's New.'
    • Alternative fuels face challenges
      With gasoline prices seeming to stabilize and fuel economy measures taking hold is there a compelling need for alternative fuels? Automotive engineers offer some surprising reasons why there is.
    • Touch-less control coming to cars
      Use of proximity and gesture-recognition systems in auto cockpits could rise fifty-fold within a decade.
    • Forming a strong bond
      Multi-material vehicles are becoming more prevalent as automakers attempt to reduce vehicle weight and boost fuel efficiency. Selecting the proper adhesive is critical when bonding dissimilar materials.
    • SAE 2014 World Congress preview special section: 'Creating New Possibilities'
      Host company Hyundai and Tier 1 Strategic Partner, Delphi, established "Creating New Possibilities" as the theme for this year's premier engineering event taking place April 8-10 in Detroit's Cobo Center. This special Congress preview section uncovers some of those possibilities, featuring insights from the event's executive leadership; details of a Delphi/Hyundai advanced engine program; highlights from the technical program in the areas of powertrain, materials, testing and simulation, electronics, interiors, and body/chassis; and more.
    • Designing for downforce
      Airflow is paramount for performance vehicles, which require aerodynamic enhancements to promote high-speed stability and greater cornering capability.
    • Powering a drive to higher voltages
      48-V systems are likely to power a new generation of functions including stop-start technology.
    • Managing the deluge of data
      The model-based development (MBD) process has been a key enabler of technical advancement in the transportation industry; however, the MBD process leads to the generation of large volumes of data artifacts and work products. To maintain efficiency while continuously improving the quality of products, it is necessary to be able to manage this data in an efficient manner.
    • A vision for SAE's future
      Longtime GM engineering executive and STEM education supporter Daniel M. Hancock brings a focused approach to his term as SAE International President.
    • Picturing a brighter future
      Displays are becoming a central focus for automotive interior design, forcing engineers to examine myriad trade-offs related to size, resolution, and supporting electronics.
    • New technologies for 2014
      OEM and supplier engineers are all about technical innovation. In this special feature, Automotive Engineering International highlights (in no special order) some notable ones debuting on 2014 models.
    • Tackling biodiesel's technical challenges
      Engineers and researchers are working to mitigate biodiesel's negative effects on engine components and aftertreatment systems.
    • Lightweighting with iron
      Grede throws advanced ultra-high-strength cast ductile iron into the lightweight-materials ring for commercial-vehicle chassis and powertrain applications.
    • Silicon takes over
      Semiconductor suppliers are altering materials so automakers can add functions and improve reliability.
    • Taming automotive complexity with digital optimization
      From helping automotive engineers develop lighter structures to delivering fewer defects in manufacturing, digital tool providers are continuing their push upstream in the engineering process.
    • Chrysler sees the ICE future
      The three-year, $30 million Multi-fuel Multiair R&D program with the U.S. DOE is nearing completion. Here's what Chrysler Powertrain engineers have learned as they try to achieve a 25% fuel-efficiency gain.
    • Counteracting cyber-attacks
      As vehicle systems become more complex and interact with more internal and external elements, the potential for outside intrusion and tampering increases for both vehicles and the transportation infrastructure.
    • Kia moves upscale with 2014 Cadenza
      The all-new premium sedan is the Korean automaker's 'most technologically advanced' vehicle ever on U.S. roadways.
    • 2014 Corvette: 460 hp, 30 mpg, 1 g, $52,000
      No other sports car can match the C7's combination of performance, value, and overall efficiency. Chief Engineer Tadge Juechter provides insight on executing a masterpiece.
    • Mercedes anticipates the future with new S-Class
      Mercedes-Benz, using networked electronic systems (sensor fusion), is introducing on its new S-Class a step-change suspension system that can 'see' (via a stereo camera) the road surface ahead and make ultra-high-speed decisions on how to deal with it.
    • Toyota engineers a shine into the 2014 Corolla
      In an effort to stay competitive with a car that has been on the market for 47 years, Toyota will offer an all-new Corolla for 2014 with a CVT with intelligent shifting and standard LED headlamps.
    • Seating solutions steer toward steel
      Zoomy-looking designs and alternative materials are eye-catching and save weight, but steel keeps getting lighter.
    • Honda flexes new powertrain muscle
      Honda R&D's top engineer outlines his company's Earth Dreams powertrain assault that includes more efficient, robust, and refined ICEs; new hybrid drive systems; and further developments in FCEVs, HCCI, plasma ignitions, and Rankine-cycle engine types.
    • Setting Hyundai's fuel cell strategy
      Hyundai is one of two major OEMs that are still going it alone in developing FCEV technology, rather than collaborating with competitors. The company's head of fuel cell R&D explains the path toward 2015 series production.
    • Volvo Trucks makes a case for DME
      The truck maker is working with Oberon Fuels and others to bring dimethyl ether-what company execs say is one of the most promising sustainable alternative fuels-to North America in 2015.
    • Sensing a need for creature comforts
      Automakers and suppliers are turning to new sensors to help make cabins more comfortable and safer while automating some tasks.
    • Apps hit the road
      To make it possible to run safe, useful apps while vehicles are being driven, companies throughout the automotive supply chain are changing the way they work together. Figuring out how to attract and integrate small and large app companies into the long development cycle of vehicles is a major challenge.
    • Gearing up for long lifetimes
      For transmission control engineers, a greater focus on reliability is prompting a shift to standards such as ISO 26262 and an improved diagnostics function that takes a broader view, looking at the overall system vs. individual components.
    • Engine boosting goes full bore
      Pumping more air into the cylinder is key to solving the CAFE puzzle, and engineers are hard at work figuring out the best ways to do it with turbocharger and supercharger innovation.
    • Building a pathway for autonomous driving
      Existing safety systems will be augmented by onboard and external inputs; the biggest challenges will be designing the software that makes proper decisions without error and liability concerns.
    • Steel in control
      Hyundai Steel develops a new 780-MPa grade of hot-rolled high-strength steel for application in a one-piece front lower control arm, displaying the potential for an 8% mass reduction.
    • Oak Ridge answers A/C-on fuel use questions
      The lab runs fuel-economy tests with A/C on maximum vs. A/C 'comfort level,' A/C-off and with windows open and closed. Some results are surprising, including an unexpected 'crossover' point in testing on a Toyota Corolla.
    • Global Viewpoints - Europe: Smartening up R&D
      As every aspect of automotive technology makes rapid advances, R&D becomes ever more complex and faces additional pressures on cost and time. In our annual report from Europe, we spoke to very senior executives about their R&D methods and the demanding criteria they face.
    • LEDs light the way for SuperTruck
      A research team developed a group of low-energy; high-output LED lamps for forward lighting that could be retrofitted into the truck's current incandescent headlamp housing and lens.
    • Plastic proliferation under the hood
      Plastic components continue to displace metal engine parts because of cost and weight advantages.